Teaching

2017 to present. Department of Biology, The University of Winnipeg

  • Comparative Animal Physiology, BIOL 3602— A lecture- and lab-based course that explores animal physiology with a special focus on excitable cells (e.g., neurons and muscle cells). Topics covered include homeostasis, the nervous system, muscle physiology, and circulatory stems. Labs focus on hands-on experimentation to support lecture material. (offered every fall term)
  • Ichthyology, BIOL 4112— A lecture- and lab-based course that highlights fish diversity, evolution, adaptation, and importance to humans. Specific examples of fish in Canada and Manitoba are discussed. Labs include exercises that center around skeletal dissection, fish identification, form and function, and age and growth.  (offered during winter term of even years)
  • Freshwater Ecology, BIOL 3401— TBA (offered during fall term of even years)

2015 to 2017. Instructor, Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois

  • Fisheries Techniques, NRES 285— A field-based course for juniors and seniors to learn skills associated with fish biology and fisheries management (e.g., fish capture/handling, habitat assessment, data analysis, etc.). Taught in 2015 and 2016.
  • Wildlife Population Ecology, NRES 407— An upper-year course that teaches the fundamentals to population ecology and wildlife management. The course also has a lab-based component where students implement theory by completing computer-based exercises. Teaching in 2017.

2014. Instructor, Institute of Environmental Sciences, Carleton University

  • Aquatic Conservation,  ENSC 4700— A seminar and discussion course for upper-year environmental science students to investigate the multitude of issues facing aquatic biota and ecosystems. Topics include invasive species, climate change, habitat degradation, hydropower, environmental toxicology, etc. Taught in 2014.

2006-Present. Guest Lecturer

  • Physics and Time, Carleton University— A course designed to introduce the concept of time to physics students and to explore the topic of time in multiple disciplines. My lectures focus on biological clocks, aging, and temporal scales in ecology.
  • Environmental Science and Management: from  theory to practice, Carleton University— A course that exposes upper-year students to environmental management in Canada. My lecture involves detailing work I completed involving the population ecology and management of Blanding’s Turtles as part of the construction of a road through sensitive habitat.
  • Introduction to Biology, Carleton University— The course is the first-year introductory course and my lecture explores the real-world application of ecological studies, specifically as it relates to sensitive species, including Pacific Salmon and Blanding’s Turtles.
  • Animal Communication, Queen’s University— A senior course that explores how animals communicate. My lecture details fish communication.

2007–2011. Teaching Assistant, Department of Biology, Carleton University

  • Introductory Biology I and II— A laboratory-based section of the introductory biology course. First-year students learn basic laboratory skills through hands-on exercises.  In 2010/11 I was the lead teaching assistant responsible for 15 teaching assistants. In addition to duties, I also led several workshops designed to teach students how to write successful laboratory reports. I was awarded with a prize designated for first year instructors and teaching assistants in the Faculty of Science for my successes as a teaching assistant in the course.
  • Tropical Ecology— A Carleton University field course conducted at the Cape Eleuthera Institute, Bahamas. Students learn about tropical ecology, marine protected areas, and sustainable development through daily seminars, expeditions, and hands-on activities.

2005—2007. Teaching Assistant, Department of Biology Queen’s University

  • Fisheries Biology— A course that teaches the fundamentals of fisheries management and biology. Topics included catch-and-release science, marine protected areas, population collapses, and aquaculture.
  • Fish Ecology— A field course conducted at the Queen’s University Biological Station where students learn hands-on techniques related to fish ecology, as well as conduct a scientific research project focused on fish ecology.
  • Winter Ecology— A field course conducted at the Queen’s University Biological Station where students explore the animal ecology of winter, as well as conduct a scientific research project focused on winter ecology.
  • Population and Evolutionary Ecology— Introductory ecology for biologists. Laboratory component of course included mini-lectures, demonstrations, excursions, and the completion of computer-based and hands-on exercises.
  • Community and Ecosystem Ecology—  Introductory ecology for biologists. Laboratory component of course included mini-lectures, demonstrations, excursions, and the completion of computer-based and hands-on exercises.
  • Diversity of Life II (Introduction to Zoology)— Laboratory component of a course designed to explore biodiversity and taxonomy. Students complete dissections.
  • Data Management and Analysis for Biologists— Statistics course where students complete exercies using the program JMP.

2004. Guest Instructor, Department of Biology, Queen’s University

  • Population Ecology Field Weekend, Queen’s University Biological Station— Due to my experience with using GIS and GPS in field ecology research, I was invited to assist the course coordinator with a module related to the spatial ecology of chipmunks.
  • Queen’s University Biological Station— Lectured both in-house biologists and public guests on the use of GIS in field ecology research.
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